あのときの王子くん / The Little Prince — czytaj online. Strona 5

Japońsko-angielska dwujęzyczna książka

アントワーヌ・ド・サン=テグジュペリ

あのときの王子くん

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

The Little Prince

「じゃあ、わたしのものだ。さいしょにおもいついたんだから。」

“Then they belong to me, because I was the first person to think of it.”

「それでいいの?」

“Is that all that is necessary?”

「もちろん。たとえば、きみが、だれのものでもないダイヤを見つけたら、それはきみのものになる。だれのものでもない島を見つけたら、それはきみのもの。さいしょになにかをおもいついたら、〈とっきょ〉がとれる。きみのものだ。だから、わたしは星をじぶんのものにする。なぜなら、わたしよりさきに、だれひとりも、そんなことをおもいつかなかったからだ。」

“Certainly. When you find a diamond that belongs to nobody, it is yours. When you discover an island that belongs to nobody, it is yours. When you get an idea before any one else, you take out a patent on it: it is yours. So with me: I own the stars, because nobody else before me ever thought of owning them.”

「うん、なるほど。」と王子くんはいった。「で、それをどうするの?」

“Yes, that is true,” said the little prince. “And what do you do with them?”

「とりあつかう。かぞえて、かぞえなおす。」と、しごとにんげんはいった。「むずかしいぞ。だが、わたしは、ちゃんとしたにんげんなんだ!」

“I administer them,” replied the businessman. “I count them and recount them. It is difficult. But I am a man who is naturally interested in matters of consequence.”

王子くんは、まだなっとくできなかった。

The little prince was still not satisfied.

「ぼくは、スカーフいちまい、ぼくのものだったら、首のまわりにまきつけて、おでかけする。ぼくは、花が1りん、ぼくのものだったら、花をつんでもっていく。でも、きみ、星はつめないよね!」

“If I owned a silk scarf,” he said, “I could put it around my neck and take it away with me. If I owned a flower, I could pluck that flower and take it away with me. But you cannot pluck the stars from heaven…”

「そうだ。だが、ぎんこうにあずけられる。」

“No. But I can put them in the bank.”

「それってどういうこと?」

“Whatever does that mean?”

「じぶんの星のかずを、ちいさな紙きれにかきとめるってことだ。そうしたら、その紙を、ひきだしにしまって、カギをかける。」

“That means that I write the number of my stars on a little paper. And then I put this paper in a drawer and lock it with a key.”

「それだけ?」

“And that is all?”

「それでいいんだ!」

“That is enough,” said the businessman.

王子くんはおもった。『おもしろいし、それなりにかっこいい。でも、ぜんぜんちゃんとしてない!』

“It is entertaining,” thought the little prince. “It is rather poetic. But it is of no great consequence.”

王子くんは、ちゃんとしたことについて、おとなのひとと、ちがったかんがえをもっていたんだ。

On matters of consequence, the little prince had ideas which were very different from those of the grown-ups.

「ぼく。」と、その子はことばをつづける。「花が1りん、ぼくのもので、まいにち水をやります。火山がみっつ、ぼくのもので、まいしゅう、ススはらいをします。それに、火がきえてるのも、ススはらいします。まんがいちがあるから。火山のためにも、花のためにもなってます、ぼくのものにしてるってことが。でも、きみは星のためにはなってません……」

“I myself own a flower,” he continued his conversation with the businessman, “which I water every day. I own three volcanoes, which I clean out every week (for I also clean out the one that is extinct; one never knows). It is of some use to my volcanoes, and it is of some use to my flower, that I own them. But you are of no use to the stars…”

しごとにんげんは、口もとをひらいたけど、かえすことばが、みつからなかった。王子くんは、そこをあとにした。

The businessman opened his mouth, but he found nothing to say in answer. And the little prince went away.

おとなのひとって、やっぱりただのへんてこりんだ、とだけ、その子は心のなかでおもいつつ、たびはつづく。

“The grown-ups are certainly altogether extraordinary,” he said simply, talking to himself as he continued on his journey.

14

XIV

いつつめの星は、すごくふしぎなところだった。ほかのどれよりも、ちいさかった。ほんのぎりぎり、あかりと、あかりつけの入るばしょがあるだけだった。

The fifth planet was very strange. It was the smallest of all. There was just enough room on it for a street lamp and a lamplighter.

王子くんは、どうやってもわからなかった。空のこんなばしょで、星に家もないし、人もいないのに、あかりとあかりつけがいて、なんのためになるんだろうか。それでも、その子は、心のなかでこうおもった。

The little prince was not able to reach any explanation of the use of a street lamp and a lamplighter, somewhere in the heavens, on a planet which had no people, and not one house. But he said to himself, nevertheless:

『このひとは、ばかばかしいかもしれない。でも、王さま、みえっぱり、しごとにんげんやのんだくれなんかよりは、ばかばかしくない。そうだとしても、このひとのやってることには、いみがある。あかりをつけるってことは、たとえるなら、星とか花とかが、ひとつあたらしくうまれるってこと。だから、あかりをけすのは、星とか花をおやすみさせるってこと。とってもすてきなおつとめ。すてきだから、ほんとうに、だれかのためになる。』

“It may well be that this man is absurd. But he is not so absurd as the king, the conceited man, the businessman, and the tippler. For at least his work has some meaning. When he lights his street lamp, it is as if he brought one more star to life, or one flower. When he puts out his lamp, he sends the flower, or the star, to sleep. That is a beautiful occupation. And since it is beautiful, it is truly useful.”

その子は星にちかづくと、あかりつけにうやうやしくあいさつをした。

When he arrived on the planet he respectfully saluted the lamplighter.

「こんにちは。どうして、いま、あかりをけしたの?」

“Good morning. Why have you just put out your lamp?”

「しなさいっていわれてるから。」と、あかりつけはこたえた。「こんにちは。」

“Those are the orders,” replied the lamplighter. “Good morning.”

「しなさいって、なにを?」

“What are the orders?”

「このあかりをけせって。こんばんは。」

“The orders are that I put out my lamp. Good evening.”

と、そのひとは、またつけた。

And he lighted his lamp again.

「えっ、どうして、いま、またつけたの?」

“But why have you just lighted it again?”

「しなさいっていわれてるから。」と、あかりつけはこたえた。

“Those are the orders,” replied the lamplighter.

「よくわかんない。」と王子くんはいった。

“I do not understand,” said the little prince.

「わかんなくていいよ。」と、あかりつけはいった。「しなさいは、しなさいだ。こんにちは。」

“There is nothing to understand,” said the lamplighter. “Orders are orders. Good morning.”

と、あかりをけした。

And he put out his lamp.

それから、おでこを赤いチェックのハンカチでふいた。

Then he mopped his forehead with a handkerchief decorated with red squares.

「それこそ、ひどいしごとだよ。むかしは、ものがわかってた。あさけして、夜つける。ひるのあまったじかんをやすんで、夜のあまったじかんは、ねる……」

“I follow a terrible profession. In the old days it was reasonable. I put the lamp out in the morning, and in the evening I lighted it again. I had the rest of the day for relaxation and the rest of the night for sleep.”

「じゃあ、そのころとは、べつのことをしなさいって?」

“And the orders have been changed since that time?”

「おなじことをしなさいって。」と、あかりつけはいった。「それがほんっと、ひどい話なんだ! この星は年々、まわるのがどんどん早くなるのに、おなじことをしなさいって!」

“The orders have not been changed,” said the lamplighter. “That is the tragedy! From year to year the planet has turned more rapidly and the orders have not been changed!”

「つまり?」

“Then what?” asked the little prince.

「つまり、いまでは、1ぷんでひとまわりするから、ぼくにはやすむひまが、すこしもありゃしない。1ぷんのあいだに、つけたりけしたり!」

“Then — the planet now makes a complete turn every minute, and I no longer have a single second for repose. Once every minute I have to light my lamp and put it out!”

「へんなの! きみんちじゃ、1日が1ぷんだなんて!」

“That is very funny! A day lasts only one minute, here where you live!”

「なにがへんだよ。」と、あかりつけがいった。「もう、ぼくらは1か月もいっしょにしゃべってるんだ。」

“It is not funny at all!” said the lamplighter. “While we have been talking together a month has gone by.”

「1か月?」

“A month?”

「そう。30ぷん、30日! こんばんは。」

“Yes, a month. Thirty minutes. Thirty days. Good evening.”

と、またあかりをつけた。

And he lighted his lamp again.

王子くんは、そのひとのことをじっと見た。しなさいっていわれたことを、こんなにもまじめにやる、このあかりつけのことが、すきになった。

As the little prince watched him, he felt that he loved this lamplighter who was so faithful to his orders.

その子は、夕ぐれを見たいとき、じぶんからイスをうごかしていたことを、おもいだした。その子は、この友だちをたすけたかった。

He remembered the sunsets which he himself had gone to seek, in other days, merely by pulling up his chair; and he wanted to help his friend.

「ねえ……やすみたいときに、やすめるコツ、知ってるよ……」

“You know,” he said, “I can tell you a way you can rest whenever you want to…”

「いつだってやすみたいよ。」と、あかりつけはいった。

“I always want to rest,” said the lamplighter.

ひとっていうのは、まじめにやってても、なまけたいものなんだ。

For it is possible for a man to be faithful and lazy at the same time. The little prince went on with his explanation:

王子くんは、ことばをつづけた。
「きみの星、ちいさいから、大またなら3ぽでひとまわりできるよね。ずっと日なたにいられるように、ゆっくりあるくだけでいいんだよ。やすみたくなったら、きみはあるく……すきなぶんだけ、おひるがずっとつづく。」

The little prince went on with his explanation:
“Your planet is so small that three strides will take you all the way around it. To be always in the sunshine, you need only walk along rather slowly. When you want to rest, you will walk — and the day will last as long as you like.”

「そんなの、たいしてかわらないよ。」と、あかりつけはいった。「ぼくがずっとねがってるのは、ねむることなんだ。」

“That doesn’t do me much good,” said the lamplighter. “The one thing I love in life is to sleep.”

「こまったね。」と王子くんがいった。

“Then you’re unlucky,” said the little prince.

「こまったね。」と、あかりつけもいった。「こんにちは。」

“I am unlucky,” said the lamplighter. “Good morning.”

と、あかりをけした。

And he put out his lamp.

王子くんは、ずっととおくへたびをつづけながら、こんなふうにおもった。『あのひと、ほかのみんなから、ばかにされるだろうな。王さま、みえっぱり、のんだくれ、しごとにんげんから。でも、ぼくからしてみれば、たったひとり、あのひとだけは、へんだとおもわなかった。それっていうのも、もしかすると、あのひとが、じぶんじゃないことのために、あくせくしてたからかも。』

“That man,” said the little prince to himself, as he continued farther on his journey, “that man would be scorned by all the others: by the king, by the conceited man, by the tippler, by the businessman. Nevertheless he is the only one of them all who does not seem to me ridiculous. Perhaps that is because he is thinking of something else besides himself.”

その子は、ざんねんそうにためいきをついて、さらにかんがえる。

He breathed a sigh of regret, and said to himself, again:

『たったひとり、あのひとだけ、ぼくは友だちになれるとおもった。でも、あのひとの星は、ほんとにちいさすぎて、ふたりも入らない……』

“That man is the only one of them all whom I could have made my friend. But his planet is indeed too small. There is no room on it for two people…”

ただ、王子くんとしては、そうとはおもいたくなかったんだけど、じつは、この星のことも、ざんねんにおもっていたんだ。だって、なんといっても、24じかんに1440回も夕ぐれが見られるっていう、めぐまれた星なんだから!

What the little prince did not dare confess was that he was sorry most of all to leave this planet, because it was blest every day with 1440 sunsets!

15

XV

むっつめの星は、なん10ばいもひろい星だった。ぶあつい本をいくつも書いている、おじいさんのすまいだった。

The sixth planet was ten times larger than the last one. It was inhabited by an old gentleman who wrote voluminous books.

「おや、たんけん家じゃな。」王子くんが見えるなり、そのひとは大ごえをあげた。

“Oh, look! Here is an explorer!” he exclaimed to himself when he saw the little prince coming.

王子くんは、つくえの上にこしかけて、ちょっといきをついた。もうそれだけたびをしたんだ!

The little prince sat down on the table and panted a little. He had already traveled so much and so far!

「どこから来たね?」と、おじいさんはいった。

“Where do you come from?” the old gentleman said to him.

「なあに、そのぶあつい本?」と王子くんはいった。「ここでなにしてるの?」

“What is that big book?” said the little prince. “What are you doing?”

「わしは、ちりのはかせじゃ。」と、おじいさんはいった。

“I am a geographer,” said the old gentleman.

「なあに、そのちりのはかせっていうのは?」

“What is a geographer?” asked the little prince.

「ふむ、海、川、町、山、さばくのあるところをよくしっとる、もの知りのことじゃ。」

“A geographer is a scholar who knows the location of all the seas, rivers, towns, mountains, and deserts.”

「けっこうおもしろそう。」と王子くんはいった。「やっと、ほんもののしごとにであえた!」

“That is very interesting,” said the little prince. “Here at last is a man who has a real profession!”

それからその子は、はかせの星をぐるりと見た。こんなにもでんとした星は、見たことがなかった。

And he cast a look around him at the planet of the geographer. It was the most magnificent and stately planet that he had ever seen.

「とってもみごとですね、あなたの星は。大うなばらは、あるの?」

“Your planet is very beautiful,” he said. “Has it any oceans?”

「まったくもってわからん。」と、はかせはいった。

“I couldn’t tell you,” said the geographer.

「えっ!(王子くんは、がっかりした。)じゃあ、山は?」

“Ah!” The little prince was disappointed. “Has it any mountains?”

「まったくもってわからん。」と、はかせはいった。

“I couldn’t tell you,” said the geographer.

「じゃあ、町とか川とか、さばくとかは?」

“And towns, and rivers, and deserts?”

「それも、まったくもってわからん。」と、はかせはいった。

“I couldn’t tell you that, either.”

「でも、ちりのはかせなんでしょ!」

“But you are a geographer!”

「さよう。」と、はかせはいった。「だが、たんけん家ではない。それに、わしの星にはたんけん家がおらん。ちりのはかせはな、町、川、山、海、大うなばらやさばくをかぞえに行くことはない。

“Exactly,” the geographer said. “But I am not an explorer. I haven’t a single explorer on my planet. It is not the geographer who goes out to count the towns, the rivers, the mountains, the seas, the oceans, and the deserts.

はかせというのは、えらいひとだもんで、あるきまわったりはせん。じぶんのつくえを、はなれることはない。そのかわり、たんけん家を、むかえるんじゃ。はかせは、たんけん家にものをたずね、そのみやげ話をききとる。そやつらの話で、そそられるものがあったら、そこではかせは、そのたんけん家が、しょうじきものかどうかをしらべるんじゃ。」

The geographer is much too important to go loafing about. He does not leave his desk. But he receives the explorers in his study. He asks them questions, and he notes down what they recall of their travels. And if the recollections of any one among them seem interesting to him, the geographer orders an inquiry into that explorer’s moral character.”

「どうして?」

“Why is that?”

「というのもな、たんけん家がウソをつくと、ちりの本はめちゃくちゃになってしまう。のんだくれのたんけん家も、おなじだ。」

“Because an explorer who told lies would bring disaster on the books of the geographer. So would an explorer who drank too much.”

「どうして?」と王子くんはいった。

“Why is that?” asked the little prince.

「というのもな、よっぱらいは、ものがだぶって見える。そうすると、はかせは、ひとつしかないのに、ふたつ山があるように、書きとめてしまうからの。」

“Because intoxicated men see double. Then the geographer would note down two mountains in a place where there was only one.”

「たんけん家に、ふむきなひと、ぼく知ってるよ。」と王子くんはいった。

“I know some one,” said the little prince, “who would make a bad explorer.”

「いるじゃろな。ところで、そのたんけん家が、しょうじきそうだったら、はかせは、なにが見つかったのか、たしかめることになる。」

“That is possible. Then, when the moral character of the explorer is shown to be good, an inquiry is ordered into his discovery.”

「見に行くの?」

“One goes to see it?”

「いや。それだと、あまりにめんどうじゃ。だから、はかせは、たんけん家に、それをしんじさせるだけのものを出せ、という。たとえば、大きな山を見つけたっていうんであれば、大きな石ころでももってこにゃならん。」

“No. That would be too complicated. But one requires the explorer to furnish proofs. For example, if the discovery in question is that of a large mountain, one requires that large stones be brought back from it.”

はかせは、ふいにわくわくしだした。

The geographer was suddenly stirred to excitement.

「いやはや、きみはとおくから来たんだな! たんけん家だ! さあ、わしに、きみの星のことをしゃべってくれんか。」

“But you — you come from far away! You are an explorer! You shall describe your planet to me!”

そうやって、はかせはノートをひらいて、えんぴつをけずった。はかせというものは、たんけん家の話をまず、えんぴつで書きとめる。それから、たんけん家が、しんじられるだけのものを出してきたら、やっとインクで書きとめるんだ。

And, having opened his big register, the geographer sharpened his pencil. The recitals of explorers are put down first in pencil. One waits until the explorer has furnished proofs, before putting them down in ink.

「それで?」と、はかせはたずねた。

“Well?” said the geographer expectantly.

「えっと、ぼくんち。」と王子くんはいった。「あんまりおもしろくないし、すごくちいさいんだ。みっつ火山があって、ふたつは火がついていて、ひとつはきえてる。でも、まんがいちがあるかもしれない。」

“Oh, where I live,” said the little prince, “it is not very interesting. It is all so small. I have three volcanoes. Two volcanoes are active and the other is extinct. But one never knows.”

「まんがいちがあるかもしれんな。」と、はかせはいった。

“One never knows,” said the geographer.

「花もあるよ。」

“I have also a flower.”

「わしらは、花については書きとめん。」と、はかせはいった。

“We do not record flowers,” said the geographer.

「どうしてなの! いちばんきれいだよ!」

“Why is that? The flower is the most beautiful thing on my planet!”

「というのもな、花ははかないんじゃ。」

“We do not record them,” said the geographer, “because they are ephemeral.”

「なに、その〈はかない〉って?」

“What does that mean — ‘ephemeral’?”

「ちりの本はな、」と、はかせはいう。「すべての本のなかで、いちばんちゃんとしておる。ぜったい古くなったりせんからの。山がうごいたりするなんぞ、めったにない。大うなばらがひあがるなんぞ、めったにない。わしらは、かわらないものを書くんじゃ。」

“Geographies,” said the geographer, “are the books which, of all books, are most concerned with matters of consequence. They never become old-fashioned. It is very rarely that a mountain changes its position. It is very rarely that an ocean empties itself of its waters. We write of eternal things.”

「でも、きえた火山が目をさますかも。」と王子くんはわりこんだ。「なあに、その〈はかない〉って?」

“But extinct volcanoes may come to life again,” the little prince interrupted. “What does that mean — ‘ephemeral’?”